Hanford Site Risk Assessments

The largest environmental restoration effort in the nation, comprising 586 square miles (roughly half the size of Rhode Island), is being conducted at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Site, located adjacent to the Columbia River, became a federal facility in 1943, when the U.S. Government took possession of the land to produce nuclear materials for national defense purposes. The Hanford Site’s production mission continued until the late 1980s, when the mission changed from producing nuclear materials to cleaning up the radioactive and hazardous wastes that had been generated during decades of operation. Neptune and Company, Inc. has partnered with two other small businesses—Environmental Quality Management and Environmental Assessment Services. Since 2003, our small business team has assisted in planning, implementing, and documenting risk assessments at the site. Currently we are completing the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment, which includes upland, riparian, and near-shore resources along approximately 41 miles of the Columbia River shoreline. The ecological and human health risk assessment efforts evaluate risks from facility operations and reactors along and within the Columbia River as well as risk in areas in between the reactors and groundwater plumes. The data evaluated in the risk assessment are depicted below and are accessed using GiSdT (Guided Interactive Statistical Decision Tools), developed by Neptune and Company, Inc. GiSdT provides statistical guidance, performs analyses, and provides a mechanism for sharing data and analyses with stakeholders.

Hanford's 100 B/C Area undergoing remediation

Hanford's 100 B/C Area undergoing remediation

Backfilled and remediated waste site, B reactor in the background

Backfilled and remediated waste site, B reactor in the background

The N reactor on the Columbia River shoreline

The N reactor on the Columbia River shoreline